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Posts Tagged ‘autumn’

Spotted leaf-a painting a day

January 28, 2012 Leave a comment

4″ x 2″ 10cm x 5cm approx

Another in the leaf series. Took a walk today inthe woods , wonderful sunshine cutting across the landscape and reaching right into the woodland. It was warm enough to lift the scent of the Daphne bhuloa allowing it to drift along paths and avenues from where it called me like  a siren might a sailor. Silly to plant it next to the wintersweet with its less exotic smell I thought,  a mistake I have also made -I realised as I got home.

#191

 

 

Lemon yellow and pink, leaves.

November 13, 2011 Leave a comment

20111112-103227.jpg

20111112-103249.jpg

detail of ” Lemon yellow and pink, leaves.”

These are the leaves of one of the lacecap hydrangeas , there is something quite surreal about their pink flush on lemon yellow. A painting which is larger than most of those in this blog, it measures :

22cm x 30cm 9″ x 12″ approx.

#183

Maple leaves – a painting a day

November 15, 2010 Leave a comment

This painting has been framed and is for sale at Burgess Hill Open Houses see blog for June 4th

size 5 in x 4.5 in, 13cm x 12cm

These are leaves which I picked up the day the car went for repair last week. They are starting to curl and dry out indoors.

No1 son came home looking cheerful and well although the journey home had taken three hours longer than it was supposed to because the sea was too rough for the ferry to take them off Arran. His clothes washing requirements were remarkably light as it seemed he had spent most of the week in the one outfit. In fairness he had changed his socks more than twice! He had obviously enjoyed the chocolate brownies as there were chocolate cake crumbs scattered throughout his day bag.

The decorator arrived this morning as arranged and DIY Dad has been in a frenzy of activity involving his latest tool the mighty mitre saw. The decorator would obviously prefer it if the skirting boards are in place before he gets to them.

The garden is looking very dismal, things are collapsing in dark rotting heaps; looking for some flowers the other day was very depressing  the roses that have been visible through the back door look tatty close up, I found one stem in a more sheltered area, a single decent stem of snowberry and one of Shizostylis which has left it rather too late to flower.

#154 a painting a day by Alison Warner on her lemon a day art blog

Berries, Feather, Maple leaf – a painting a day

November 11, 2010 4 comments

 size 6 in x 9 in, 15cm x 24cm

I found the most extraordinary picture on the web it is by an artist from Myanmar or Burma, Win Pe Myint,  he is both a painter and a Botanist as I am. It has, I am sure, a wealth of story in the objects chosen. The postcard in the foreground is Picasso’s ‘ Acrobat with Ball’, it has the most concentrated air of still contemplation I have seen in a picture, and it has a very quiet lemon in there too.

Here is the link:

http://www.asia-fineart.com//painting_details.php?painting_id=1163&order_by=`painting`.`title`&page_from=artists&item=0&num_paintings=10&artist_id=87&status=1

Yesterdays picture is another in the series of things picked up in this autumn, here are some berries, the feather of a green woodpecker and a distorted maple leaf. I am putting all of these for sale on my Lemonaday-shop as it forms a permanent Gallery. Or rather it should do, having checked the links they all seem to have broken.

No1 son should return today, I dread to think what state he will be in the weather has been foul for the last two days. Still no news could be good news…

153 a painting a day or three a month if you are lucky

Autumn leaves , Beech, Hornbeam, Beech – a painting a day

November 7, 2010 Leave a comment

This painting has been framed and is for sale at Burgess Hill Open Houses see blog for June 4th

size 6 in x 9 in, 15cm x 24cm

No1 son has gone off to the frozen North to look at rivers. I am feeling slightly anxious about this as there really is snow forecast for Monday on the teeth of a gale. He is not designed for heat retention being extremely thin, also he never thinks it’s a good idea to put any thought into dressing for the weather.

The leaves are all falling in great heaps now; there is a job for months, if not life ,out there on my own back lawn. I dug out a bag of old leaf mould the other day and it proves it is worth collecting and composting the leaves. I have enough to layer it six inches deep on the new bed (which needs it as it’s very clayish).

The painting is of some richly coloured Beech leaves with, I think, a Hornbeam leaf in the middle.

#151 a painting a day by Alison Warner on her lemon a day art blog

Apple, Cherry and Pear Leaf – a painting a day

October 29, 2010 Leave a comment

This painting has been framed and is for sale at Burgess Hill Open Houses see blog for June 4th

size 6 in x 6 in, 15cm x 15cm

I had said on Twitter that I was going to stop myself from doing another picture with an apple in it…sort of, these three leaves have all undergone a selective process of winding down for winter, the tree has been extracting and storing in the roots what will be useful in the spring and neatly sealing off and jettisoning what will not be needed. All deciduous plants do this, they just each do it in a slightly different way. The apple leaf is slightly dotty, the cherry is beyond over the top and the pear is dark and a little deathly. Some of the best colour in the garden is quite unexpected, the brightest reds are on the blueberry bushes, the subtlest tones on the Forsythia and bright lacy yellows on a tall Thalitricum. The spurge Fireglow or Amberglow is yellow and orange and looks as though its unravelling in a nice way.

DIY Dad is sanding as I write, he has been at it all day, he has taken to running a thin straight piece of oak over the surface to check that he has got it perfectly smooth and flat. We have had a few conversations about the concept of perfection. That part of the day did not go smoothly…the children have been removed by the grandparents for their own protection, this was never going to be nice. My belief is that if you have to search flat on your belly for a fault, it really isn’t worth bothering with. I also believe that eventually when you’ve sanded off the obvious, then sanded some more for the undetectable to normal human beings fault and then sanded some more to make the first two sandings match up and then gone over it again for some ghostly grey marks that could be anything …how thick will the floorboard end up? How deaf will you have become from the noise? ear protectors or not…how ratty will your wife be?

Yesterday I went to Middle Farm, it was the best deal on juicing in the vicinity although it is a way off. I missed the local man who has built his own press (he’d packed it all away) and I asked Wobblegate but they were in the middle of changing over their pressing equipment. Other places were asking so much per litre to juice it was not viable for me.

In the end it cost slightly under 87p/litre and would have been less if I had taken more recycled bottles.

I took apples from the community orchard, my own cookers and some pears from the orchard. The pears were washed windfalls as the tree is pretty tall, too tall to pick without a ladder.

The pear juice is very mild but extremely pleasant; adding a few pears from our tree would probably give it a bit more zing as ours are very strongly flavoured. A giant’ Bag for Life’ full of fruit gave nearly six litres, the small spicy apples are aromatic and dry they gave six litres for the big bag, the cookers Newton Wonder gave 11 litres per bag and the mixed orchard apples yielded 10 litres per bag.

The apple juices range from fruity and sharp (the mixed bag) to sweet and very mellow for the spicy apples. The cookers are in between. I have made a solid layer in the base of the freezer. Lots of people stop and watch at Middle Farm ,it was very busy with families due to half term, so it was a sociable event even if the guy pressing had very little to say. Other people arrived before my apples were finished, they were carrying two great baskets of apples, some possibly cookers and some deep red skinned sweet apples with a bloom on the skin like a grape. Inside I had a look at their huge range of apples for sale, there were more than ten different English apples for sale. I looked at their Peasgood Nonsuch and their Charles Ross to see if it would help me decide which of the two apples the latest query apple is. The problem is they are quite similar, Peasgood being the parent of Ross. The biggest apple in the sample was 9cm across (I say was because I ate it), which makes me think it could be the parent and not the son. I would love to grow an apple with such a brilliant name Peasgood Nonsuch sounds Shakespearean almost. There is no more space for trees however.

In between the departure of the children and the arrival of the hired sanding machines we were trying to decide what to do with the walls of this room. It was done up for sale five or six years ago and as a result is as neutral and boring as semolina and a less attractive colour. The carpet was cream, the ceiling white and the walls sort of magnolia, well they are now the colour magnolia goes after a while, it seems to get a slightly fleshy pink tinge like vintage corsets that have been washed for years. I hate it and I’ve been hoping that it won’t scrub up. Equally I’ve been hoping that it will scrub up as the decorator is only booked for a week and it will take him that to erase all the grot and build damage on the hall and landing. We both loath painting, in my case as a result of doing too much in the past, in DIY ‘s case because he’s not big on fiddly stuff which doesn’t even merit a large noisy machine. I must have decorated half the rental accommodation in the Thames Valley in my youth. I painted places I only lived in for six months, in some I did murals, now I find it all a bit too much. Then of course I was generally getting rid of garish tasteless wallpaper or lime green walls or a whole northfacing flat painted powder blue (shiver) now things have changed and the problem is uniformity and lack of colour, the tyranny of neutral and pale. I say tyranny because it never lasts more than a few years without looking dirty and scuffed, but there is also a tyranny which says only neutral will do as it sells. I decorate to enjoy myself not with a view to saleability, neutral can be stifling.

#149 a painting a day by Alison Warner on her lemon a day art blog

Sheffield park – a painting a day

October 21, 2010 Leave a comment

 size 6 in x 8 in 15cm x 21cm artists soft pastels on cartridge paper

Today I looked at the devastation the frost had produced in the garden and the devastation that the boys had produced in the kitchen and in disgust I went out with a neighbour to Sheffield Park. No way to run a household I know but sometimes you need to get out. There was morning glory in the sunshine but morning misery hung resentfully on the house wall it had been – 3 degrees centigrade.

The frost had clearly caught the gardeners out at Sheffield Park too, the Gunnera was not ready for winter, the giant stems stood still but the enormous leaves hung like umbrellas broken and half melted. At first in a frost when the temperature is still low the tender plants look fine, then the sun gets to them or it warms up and the frozen leaves turn to seaweed and darken like so much wilted spinach.

I took a small sketch pad and did a pastel of one corner of the top lake. It was a mess but it held the memory of the scene long enough for me to make this version when I got home. I also sketched my neighbour and that sketch was pitiful. The patches of colour on the water were great rafts of brightly coloured leaves which had fallen with the frost. Many trees had dropped a carpet of leaves the Ginko had not got its full autumn colour but many of the leaves were down on the path.

When I got back I rescued a few more plants and checked to see what we are due tonight, nothing quite so dreadful, the dahlias can wait a day or two. We have got used to damp mild autumns that stretch beyond Bonfire Night but this is not going to be one of them. Luckily DIY Dad has finished the heating.

 #146 a painting a day by Alison Warner on her lemon a day art blog

Autumn flowers- a painting a day

October 20, 2010 1 comment

 

This painting has been framed and is for sale at Burgess Hill Open Houses see blog for June 4th

size 6 in x 10 in 15cm x 20cm watercolour on heavy weight rag paper

Life or the ongoing maths test that masquerades as life is changing. There was frost on the windscreen back and front this morning. The plants do not seem to be affected so far. Just to be on the safe side I brought in the most tender fuchsia “Thalia” and some Echeverias and the Baster Kobus which comes from Namibia and will probably cope with quite bit of cold but not damp cold. The Kalahari is surprisingly cold at night in the winter, seven or eight blankets and a husband were not enough. We used to wedge the baby between us on the coldest nights, for his sake- not ours obviously.

For todays painting I have changed the background by using a yellow pillowcase; I wanted the daffodil sky look. It’s not there yet but the colours Gauguin used are clearly findable in my world. It is very easy as a Northern European to get bogged down in drabness. I remember a painter in Cyprus, Neocles whose painting were the essence of a sun drenched day on the beach and looking at my painting realising that I was still on a non- Mediterranean dull palette. It took a conscious effort to do a painting in a better colour set for the climate. I was working in oils there as I had the space in a barn of a rented house on the Green line. Being on the line reduced the rent a bit (not enough to compensate for the Turkish Commandos crawling through the back garden one night after the Cypriots had nicked the Turkish flag on a stormy night for a laugh….well they were only kids, teenagers with large guns ….probably only a year older than No1 son, which is a very scary thought.) A full international incident was avoided because Panikos who was very short and very goofy was on guard that night, I asked him what he had done when the commandos climbed out of the dry riverbed into my garden, “ Shit I was scared” he said” I put down my gun quietly and I hid, they crawled off that way” he pointed downstream. Thinking about the spending cuts he could probably teach the British Army a thing or two about how to get by without using any of that over expensive ammo stuff.

I think the Government should simplify and declutter…stuff all the complicated spending cuts that pick on the employed middle class parents and the sick and unemployed, the coalition has already shown they can break promises with aplomb, just put up Income Tax and keep it dead simple, but put the resources into checking up on the people who hide income and dodge tax (like the occaisional MP ). No, we haven’t forgotten.

#145 a painting a day by Alison Warner on her lemon a day art blog

The Perfect Apple – a painting a day

September 30, 2010 2 comments

 size 4.5 in x 4.5 in 12cm x 12cm watercolour on heavy weight rag paper

Last night we had a power cut right in the middle of a box shifting fit. I found myself in a maze of unfamiliar objects with no lights.

Blog went out of the window and sons and DIY Dad, robbed of electicity dependant activity, went to our bed and  were read Tolkein aloud by candlelight. I decided to continue with my bonfire in the dark on my own, it sort of worked for a while.

Anyway I did this quick sketch of a perfect Ellison’s Orange from high up on the tree, no sorry I was not high up on the tree, the apple came from there. It’s done with a charcoal pencil and wash

#137 a painting a day by Alison Warner on her lemon a day art blog

How Autumnal is this?

And finally the Cobea Scandens decided to flower.

Trio of early apples – a painting a day

August 11, 2010 1 comment

 this painting is framed and for sale in the burgess hill open house event see blog June 4th

Day One Hundred and ten –   a painting a day

size 6 in x 11 in 15cm x 28cm watercolour on heavy weight rag paper

Oh fantastic, we all get back from holiday and THEN we all go down like in sequence with something akin to the winter vomiting- starting before the holiday wash is complete but after DIY Dad has partially demolished the downstairs loo. He has removed the door giving an uninterrupted view of the hall and front door.

I think I have the less serious version I feel dreadful but not as if I am going to die (unlike the people I have been mopping up for).

There have been some very kind comments on my holiday pictures, for which thank you. I can whole heartedly recommend the beautiful landscape  between Dubrovnik and Split, that is the order to do it in as the ferries can be booked in advance going north but NOT going south, unless you are as persuasive as I am….

The garden looked like an autumn scene this morning, the dew was so thick a shining drop hung on every blade of grass, red apples lay on the ground and branches hung low with fruit. How can this have happened?

#110 a painting a day by Alison Warner on her lemon a day art blog

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